Workshop for Journalism Students

Posts tagged ‘editing’

Video: Make your first video

On Wednesday in the workshop, students saw a demonstration of the “five-shot method” for shooting video. The reason for using this method is that it makes editing video more easy. If you shoot without a careful plan, you will find it is very difficult to edit your video.

If you missed the workshop that day, here is an overview of the lecture:

Five Shots, 10 Seconds

This is the PowerPoint I showed about Windows Live Movie Maker. Please view it full-screen.

To find a tutorial for Windows Live Movie Maker (Windows 7), or Windows Movie Maker (Windows XP), or iMovie (Mac), please see the links on this page: Video Resources.

NOTE: Windows Live Movie Maker (WLMM) does the same things as Windows Movie Maker (WMM), but the menus and controls are different. Make sure you are using the correct tutorial for your software, or you will be very confused! The iMovie software also does the same things, but it looks very different from the Windows programs.

This is the first video assignment I give to my journalism students in the United States: Video Part 1. You can see the instructions I give to them.

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Audacity: Tutorial handout

During the workshop on Friday, I mentioned that I have a handout or instruction sheet for Audacity. It will be helpful if you forgot to take notes during class.

Here is the link:

Super-Fast Guide to Audio Editing (PDF, 290 KB)

This handout covers everything I showed during our workshop and also some additional things.

On page 5, it shows how to convert a stereo file to mono. This cuts the file size in half (very good for Web downloads).

You can find more audio resources here.

There is a second handout for Audacity. It shows how to edit multiple audio tracks in one project. This is good for adding natural sound, or combining more than one interview.

Here is the link:

Editing Audio with Audacity (Part 2) (PDF, 181 KB)

How to convert audio files

When we record an interview with a digital audio recorder, or with HP, the file is saved in some format. If the file format is MP3 or WAV, then it can be opened in Audacity.

If the file is another format, such as AMR (BlackBerry) or WMA, we must convert it first, and then open it in Audacity.

I like to use a free converter program called Switch. You can download it (Windows or Mac) here.

One of the Year 2 students recommended Format Factory (also free; Windows only).

When you convert the file, please convert it to WAV format. This makes a large, uncompressed file — best for editing. After you have the WAV file, open it in Audacity for editing.

After you have finished editing in Audacity, you will export an MP3 file. The MP3 format is compressed, making a better file for the Web because the download time is faster.